SHIP'S LOG

Charted courses and completed missions from the high seas.

September 2014

5 Principles of Great Branding Pt. 3: Connection

September 23rd, 2014

High-Five-Coffee-Brand-Connection

Image Credit – High Five Coffee Instagram

Today we continue our five part series on defining what we believe make up the top five principles of having a great brand experience.

3. Connection

Connection is the ability to communicate with your customers and clients on a number of levels. People absorb ideas and meaning in different ways. Some are drawn to the overall experience, some to design, and others to quality of service. Your brand should work to connect with the head and the heart.

CONSIDERATIONS FOR CONNECTION

Pros – 
This helps your brand to define, sustain, and foster a sense of community with your customers and clients. When they connect with your brand, they are more likely to feel like they align with your values and continue to buy from and support you.

Cons – There is always a danger that this could at some point garner a sense of exclusivity or a kind of cliquishness.

Application –  If your brand connection ends up becoming a cliché, you may isolate potential clients, offend people, and end up really hurting your business reputation. When considering this principle, make sure that in connecting with your niché market, you aren’t doing it at the expense of another market.

Connection Example

In 2012 the Dripolator, an Asheville coffee shop owned by Jay Weatherly rebranded to High Five Coffee Bar. The idea for the name came from Jay’s wife Kim in noticing that her friendly husband gave out a lot of high fives through out the course of the day. The overall goal for the rebrand was to connect with their customers by building a tribe or “hive” into their brand and working in characteristics of their existing culture.

READ ADDITIONAL ARTICLES ON PRINCIPLES OF GREAT BRANDING: 

® 2014 All creative content is the copyrighted property of Atlas Branding and may not be duplicated, manipulated or re-produced in any form without Atlas’s pre-approved consent. 


Atlas Compiles Asheville City Guide for Design*Sponge.com

September 16th, 2014

DesignSponge-Features-Asheville-City-Guide

This week, the Design*Sponge features Asheville in their city guide series. Design*Sponge is a nationally recognized creative blog founded in 2004 by Brooklyn-based writer Grace Bonney. The blog features daily stories and profiles on graphic designers, interior designers, chefs, and artisans. It currently has 75,000 daily readers, with an addition of 127,000 who subscribe by RSS.

It started with an e-mail from Atlas Branding co-founder Lisa Peteet to local resident Ashley English, a national author and blogger of Small Measure and former contributor to the Design*Sponge, to enquire as to why the Design*Sponge had never published a city guide for Asheville. “We thought it would be a beneficial resource for city visitors and area businesses so we volunteered to work on assembling one ourselves,” said Lisa Peteet.

The list consists of unique galleries, furniture stores, gift boutiques, clothing shops, restaurants and breweries that help to define and distinguish Asheville as one of the most creative places in the Southeast.

“Compiling the guide was no easy task, and eliminating options from the list was the hardest part of the process, especially since we so desperately wanted to include even more than what was on the final edited version,” said Dean Peteet.


5 Principles of Great Branding Pt. 2: Relevance

September 5th, 2014

CHIPOTLE

Image Credit – A Story About Chipotle’s Non-traditional Marketing Strategy,” by Mike Schoultz

Today we continue our five part series on defining what we believe make up the top five principles of having a great brand experience.

2. Relevance

Is the brand going to be appropriate for your communication goals, customers, and your cultural climate? Will your customers be able to connect with your business because it is pertinent to their needs and values?

CONSIDERATIONS FOR RELEVANCE

 Pros – This enables you to have a brand that is current and relatable to customers within your industry, their culture, interest and values. You can feel when your business is relevant because you hear your customers speak of your services/products like it’s something they’ve discovered, or they tell what value your business brings to their life.

Cons – Relevance is something you have to cultivate and always stay on top of. Since relevance can be limited by time or fashion there is always a danger of the loss of relevance. However, you also can try so hard to be relevant that you end up becoming irrelevant. This happens when the brand is so trendy that it becomes a novelty, which can become dated faster than normal and therefore rendered irrelevant.

Application – If you lose your relevance, you run the risk of losing some of your customers. This is because your brand or services will be perceived as dated or unnecessary, whether they truly are or not. You don’t want to be delivering ice while your competition is delivering refrigerators.

One of the bests things you can do to avoid irrelevance is staying in regular conversation and dialog with your customers. Ask them questions and be willing to hear what they have to say; the good, the bad, and the ugly.

Relevant Example

Chipotle is our pick for an example of a company that continually works on their relevance. Within the farm-to-table, buy local movement, this franchise of Mexican Grills works hard to buy meat that is free of antibiotics, locally farmed and responsibly sourced. Their overarching goal is to cultivate a better world.

READ ADDITIONAL ARTICLES ON PRINCIPLES OF GREAT BRANDING: 

® 2014 All creative content is the copyrighted property of Atlas Branding and may not be duplicated, manipulated or re-produced in any form without Atlas’s pre-approved consent.